Dharma Lecture: The Vajrapani Practice

Sunday, January 9 at 1:30 pm
Instructor: Tulku Yeshi Gyatso
Location: Shrine Room
Suggested Contribution: $25 Public, $20 Members

The practice of Vajrapani is common to all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Generally, people think of Vajrapani as a wrathful deity of power who removes obstacles. However, he actually has all the powers of the Buddhas and in essence, he is all the Buddhas’ power including wisdom and compassion. Why is his color blue? The blue represents the Dharmadhatu, which contains the five distinguishing features or aspects: body, speech, mind, qualities, and activities of all the Buddhas. When we receive the Vajrapani initiation and practice the sadhana, we must practice and visualize these five distinguishing features. The Vajrapani practice is considered an important path for achieving enlightenment. Ven. Tulku Yeshi Gyatso will discuss these concepts and explain how to practice the sadhana with the appropriate visualization, motivation, and feeling. He will also explain the reason why we call Vajrapani the “Owner of Secrets” (Sangwe Dagpo).

Ven Tulku Yeshi Gyatso Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from twenty-five masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written eight books, seven of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture including A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa. He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, and can bestow empowerments. Currently he working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle and is working on his own biography, Magic and Monk.

Dharma Lecture: Buddhism and Ending the Cycle of Anger

Sunday, December 19 at 1:30 pm
Instructor: Khenpo Jampa Tenphel
Suggested Contribution: $25 Public, $20 Members

To eliminate anger, you should practice the six perfections of the Bodhisattvacharyavata, especially patience. How do we do that in our Western lives? This talk will give you examples and practical ideas to help yourself and others by ending the cycle of anger, through understanding how anger works and how the dharma teaches us how to respond correctly to various daily challenges to our sense of self.

Khenpo Jampa Tenphel comes to us from Dzongsar Institute in India, where he was the library director as well as a tutor for many years. He received a Degree of Acharya (equivalent to an M.A.) in Buddhist Philosophy in 2002 and was ordained as an Abbott in 2004. He has received many teachings and initiations from all four sects of Tibetan Buddhism (Sakya, Gelug, Kagyu, Nyingma). Many of those teachings and initiations were from H.H. the Dalai Lama and H.H. Sakya Trizin. He has also received the Lamdre teaching from H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche. His root lamas are H.H. Sakya Trizin, H.H. Luding Khen Rinpoche, and H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche. At Sakya Monastery, Khenpo Jampa teaches intermediate and advanced level curriculum on Buddhist philosophy and also serves as the librarian for the growing collection of Tibetan Buddhist scriptures.

Dharma Lecture: Why Are Our Lives So Crazy

Sunday, December 12 at 1:30 pm
Instructor: Tulku Yeshi Gyatso
Suggested Contribution: $25 Public, $20 Members

People are usually joking when they say that someone is crazy. However, according to Buddhism, “crazy” accurately describes a person caught in samsara. The Buddha’s teachings say that in samsara there is no essence, and beings are fundamentally “crazy.” This can apply especially to people who say they are Buddhist, but do not follow the Buddhist teachings. Everything which creates your three poisons is “crazy”—we think they are real, but they are not. By studying and practicing Buddha’s teachings, you will have the knowledge and understanding to recognize the discord in your life which makes you “crazy.” You can allow your “crazy” life to continue—or choose to practice the Buddha’s teachings and gain the peace of those moving closer to enlightenment.

Ven Tulku Yeshi Gyatso Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from twenty-five masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written eight books, seven of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture including A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa. He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, and can bestow empowerments. Currently he working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle and is working on his own biography, Magic and Monk.

Special Lecture: Vajrapani

Saturday, December 4
Time: 5:30 pm
Location: Cultural Hall
Instructor: Ken Hockett
Suggested Contribution: $15 Public, $12 Members
Prerequisite: Empowerment for Mahakala Gurgyi Gonpo from a Sakya lineage-holder

Receive detailed instructions for Vajrapani Bhutadamara as part of the Mahakala puja. This class will examine the visualization and practice for Vajrapani-Bhutadamara in the context of the Mahakala Gurgyi Ponpo Puja. We will discuss its purpose, symbolism and mudras as part of this Puja in order make clear Vajrapani's role. The Mahakala puja will be at 7:30 pm.

Ken Hockett: Having studied Buddhist precepts for several years and convinced of the truth and relevance of the Buddha Dharma in my own life I sought out an entrance to the path and took refuge with H.H. Jigdal Dagchen Rinpoche in 1977. While principally my study and practice has been within the Sakya and Nyingma traditions, I have received teachings and initiations from Lamas and teachers of the Four Schools.

Dharma Lecture: The Four Seals of the Buddhist Doctrine

Sunday, November 21 at 1:30 pm
Instructor: Khenpo Jampa Tenphel
Suggested Contribution: $25 Public, $20 Members

How and why did Buddha give the four seals of the Buddhist Doctrine? How were they explained in the commentaries by the panditas of Nalanda University over a thousand years ago, and why are we still studying them? This talk will explain the Four Seals in both of those contexts, and how we can use the seals from a psychological standpoint.

Khenpo Jampa Tenphel comes to us from Dzongsar Institute in India, where he was the library director as well as a tutor for many years. He received a Degree of Acharya (equivalent to an M.A.) in Buddhist Philosophy in 2002 and was ordained as an Abbott in 2004. He has received many teachings and initiations from all four sects of Tibetan Buddhism (Sakya, Gelug, Kagyu, Nyingma). Many of those teachings and initiations were from H.H. the Dalai Lama and H.H. Sakya Trizin. He has also received the Lamdre teaching from H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche. His root lamas are H.H. Sakya Trizin, H.H. Luding Khen Rinpoche, and H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche. At Sakya Monastery, Khenpo Jampa teaches intermediate and advanced level curriculum on Buddhist philosophy and also serves as the librarian for the growing collection of Tibetan Buddhist scriptures.

 

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