Special Lecture: The Four Boundless Minds

Lecturer: Ken Hockett
Wednesday, September 21st
Time: 7:00 - 9:00 pm
Location: Cultural Hall
Suggested contribution: $25 Public, $15 Members
Prerequisite: None

Also known as the Four Immeasurables or the Four Brahma Viharas, the Four Boundless Minds are Loving-Kindness, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy and Equanimity. For those who wish to be of real benefit to suffering beings and free themselves from the selfish mind, these four attitudes are cultivated as foundations of Bodhicitta, the Awakened Mind. This class is a survey of these essential attitudes, pointing to resources for further study and development. We will discuss each of the four and share our experiences in relation to them.

Ken Hockett is one of the senior Dharma students at Sakya. After much reading and study, he took refuge before H.H. Jigdal Dagchen Sakya in 1977. His principal interest is in the Mind Training methods and has been teaching these at Sakya Monastery for over 10 years. Having received teachings and initiations from Lamas of all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism, his main teachers are of the Sakya and Nyingma traditions. He has also produced many of the practice texts used at Sakya Monastery.

Dharma Lecture: Ngorpa and Tsarpa Schools of the Sakya Tradition

Lecturer: Lama Migmar
Translator: Rigdzin Tingkhye
Sunday, September 18th
Time: 1:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Shrine Room
Suggested contribution: $45 Public, $30 Members

In this lecture, Lama Migmar will discuss about the Ngorpa and Tsarpa Traditions of the Sakya School. These sects have similar practices and lineages.

Ven. Lama Migmar was born in Kham (eastern Tibet) and studied Dharma at Kyegu Monastery, the largest and oldest Sakya monastery in the Kham region. He trained extensively in both sculpture and painting, and completed many deity retreats. He was the primary disciple of his master Lobsang Thugje from 1987 to 1993; his master created the statues in His Holiness the Dalai Lama's residence in Dharamsala. Lama Migmar's work is featured in Kagyu, Nyingma, and Sakya monasteries throughout Kham; one monastery contains over 100 of his Shitro deity statues. He has lived in India, Nepal and Malaysia, and created extensive artwork in those locations. He came to Sakya Monastery in 2007, and is Sakya Monastery's resident artist. He has recently completed a thangka of the Sakya Lamdre lineage. Currently he is working on other Buddhist paintings and can be commissioned to create thangkas, statues, and deity masks for Buddhist practitioners.

Dharma Lecture: Compassion and Hatred

Lecturer: Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche
Sunday, September 11th
Time: 1:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Shrine Room
Suggested contribution: $45 Public, $30 Members
Prerequisite: None

According to Lord Buddha’s teaching, everything is impermanent. Our ego destroys relationships and friendships easily in our daily lives, and especially affects our pure vision. Mahayana and Vajrayana practitioners need to learn how to keep and sustain our pure vision, compassion, and passions, and recognize how hatred freezes our “seeds of compassion” and destroys our peace of mind. Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche will teach from the experiences that he has had living in the East and the West on how to transcend hatred and develop compassion.

Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from forty masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written thirteen books, ten of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture, including “A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa.”  He has published three books in English: his autobiography “A Modern Liberation Odyssey - An Autobiography of a Tibetan Nomad Lama”, “Handbook for Half-Buddhas” and “Tibetan Zen.” He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, can advise people on how to enjoy their life, and can bestow empowerments.  Currently he is working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle.

Guru Rinpoche Bumtsok Retreat

Led by Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche
Saturday & Sunday, August 13-14
Time: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm with a lunch break from 12:00 - 1:30 pm
Location: Shrine Room
Prerequisite: None
Please bring a tsok offering and also your dorje, bell and dhamaru drum if possible. Also bring food for a potluck lunch.

If someone wants to become a Buddha or a Bodhisattva, one needs to accumulate merit and purify one’s defilements. A very meritorious practice of Guru Rinpoche is a Bumtsok, which is a 100,000 Tsok offerings to Guru Rinpoche. It is fine to join the first day, the second day, or both. If you cannot come, it is considered very meritorious to donate food or money for a tsok offering for this event. Candles and flowers are acceptable as well.

Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from forty masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written thirteen books, ten of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture, including “A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa.”  He has published three books in English: his autobiography “A Modern Liberation Odyssey - An Autobiography of a Tibetan Nomad Lama”, “Handbook for Half-Buddhas” and “Tibetan Zen.” He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, can advise people on how to enjoy their life, and can bestow empowerments.  Currently he is working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle.

Dharma Lecture: The Mind and the Buddha Nature

Lecturer:  Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche
Sunday, July 24th
Time: 1:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Shrine Room
Suggested contribution:  $45 Public, $30 Members
Prerequisite: None

Your mind is like milk while Buddha nature is like butter.  The mind itself cannot produce or generate the butter on its own.  It needs churning in order to become butter.  The mind itself cannot show you its Buddha nature until you are ready.  Also, if someone makes butter from milk they should keep the milk fresh and take care of it.  As practitioners we should be mindful all the time.  Within the Buddhist teachings there are many techniques in order to free the mind from defilements and its obscurations.  Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche will give training on how to be more mindful in order to develop and realize the Buddha nature.

Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from forty masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written thirteen books, ten of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture, including “A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa.”  He has published three books in English: his autobiography “A Modern Liberation Odyssey - An Autobiography of a Tibetan Nomad Lama”, “Handbook for Half-Buddhas” and “Tibetan Zen.”  He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, can advise people on how to enjoy their life, and can bestow empowerments.  Currently he is working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle.

 

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