2-Day Saka Dawa Nyung Nye Retreat

Requested by: The Tibetan Association of Washington
Led by: Khenpo Jampa Tenphel Rinpoche
Saturday and Sunday, May 7th– 8th
Time: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm
Location: Monastery Shrine Room
All are welcome

In Tibetan, the word “Nyung” means less. “Nye” means remaining. This means that we reduce our negativity and, ideally, eliminate it entirely. Nyung Nye is a practice of fasting and purification. Each morning, one takes vows and abides by them for the whole day. On the first day, one vegetarian potluck lunch is eaten at noon and liquids are taken. On the second day, no food or drink at all is consumed. In addition, this second day of practice is done in silence. On each day, practitioners do the 1,000 Armed Chenrezi practice.

Ven. Khen Jampa Rinpoche comes to us from the Dzongsar Insitute in North India, where he taught and served as library director for many years. He received his Degree of Acharya after nine years of study and graduated from Dzongsar University with a Ph.D. in philosophy. Following his 13 years of study, he was ordained an Abbott (Khenpo) in 2004 by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He spent seventeen years studying with his main teacher, H.E. Khenchen Kunga Wangchuk. He also spent three years of silent retreat in Tibet. He has received empowerments from all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism and from many great masters including H.H. the Dalai Lama, H.H. Sakya Trizin, H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche, H.H. Karmapa, and H.E. Dzongsar Khyentse. He now teaches intermediate and advanced level classes on Buddhist philosophy, sutra and highest yoga tantra all over the world. He is also the founder and president of Tibetan Education Foundation, as well as the president of the International Association of Non-sectarian Tibetan Religious Traditions (IANTRT) of North America.

Special Lecture: Combining Compassion and Emptiness

Lecturer: Ken Hockett
Sunday, April 24th
Time: 1:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Cultural Hall
Suggested contribution: $25 Public, $15 Members
Prerequisite: None

In Tibet, the tradition and transmission of Mind Training was passed down from the great Indian Master, Atisha, to the Kadampa Masters of the 11th Century. The importance of this teaching was recognized such that this teaching quickly spread to all the schools of Buddhist practice and remains an integral part of all the traditions to this day. The purpose of Mind Training (Lojong) is to develop Bodhicitta, the Mind intent on attaining Buddhahood for the benefit of others. Without Bodhicitta, true Enlightenment is not possible. The method of Mind Training is through meditation which combines Calm Abiding and Insight to experience Emptiness and through post-meditation practices of mindfulness and Compassion which includes the practice of Tonglen.

The Eight Verses of Mind Training are a very approachable set of aphorisms in verse form which contain the essentials of Mind Training. This will be a practice-oriented class on the Eight Verses and how to incorporate them into a daily Mind Training practice. There will be a brief introduction to Mind Training and the Eight Verses and we will discuss their meaning with some emphasis on the practice of Calm-Abiding/Insight Meditation and Tong-Len as components of the training. We will use a daily practice within which to provide personal continuity to this most essential practice.

Text: The Eight Verses of Mind Training of Kadam Geshé Langri Tenpa

Ken Hockett is one of the senior Dharma students at Sakya. After much reading and study, he took refuge before H.H. Jigdal Dagchen Sakya in 1977. His principal interest is in the Mind Training methods and has been teaching these at Sakya Monastery for over 10 years. Having received teachings and initiations from Lamas of all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism, his main teachers are of the Sakya and Nyingma traditions. He has also produced many of the practice texts used at Sakya Monastery.

Special Lecture: How to Set Up a Shrine in Your Home

Instructor: Ngakpa Tashi Paljor
Saturday, April 23rd
Time: 1:30 - 3:30pm
Location: Cultural Hall
Suggested Donation: $25 public; $15 members

When you begin to practice Tibetan Buddhism spiritual practices, you may want to set up a shrine and maintain it in your home as your special space for meditation. In this class, you will learn the purpose and benefits of a shrine and how to set up your own. You will learn the purpose and types of daily shrine offerings, the meaning and significance of the Eight Offerings, how to remove daily and older offerings, and how to close the shrine for the night.

Ngakpa Tashi Paljor began studying with H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche in 1977, and in his attempt to understand the teachings of the Buddha, joined Rinpoche in Pilgrimage in 2003 and Lamdre in 2007. He has taken teachings from many of the great Lamas of the 20th century and has been practicing Buddhism since 1972.

Special Lecture: How to Make a Shrine in Your Home

Instructor: Ngakpa Tashi Paljor
Saturday, March 18
Time: 1:30 - 3:30pm
Location: Cultural Hall
Suggested Donation: $25 public; $15 members

When you begin to practice Tibetan Buddhism spiritual practices, you may want to set up a shrine and maintain it in your home as your special space for meditation. In this class, you will learn the purpose and benefits of a shrine and how to set up your own. You will learn the purpose and types of daily shrine offerings, the meaning and significance of the Eight Offerings, how to remove daily and older offerings, and how to close the shrine for the night.

Ngakpa Tashi Paljor began studying with H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche in 1977, and in his attempt to understand the teachings of the Buddha, joined Rinpoche in Pilgrimage in 2003 and Lamdre in 2007. He has taken teachings from many of the great Lamas of the 20th century and has been practicing Buddhism since 1972.

Guru Rinpoche Empowerment

Led by Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche
Sunday, May 1st
1:30 - 3:30 pm
Location: Shrine Room
Suggested contribution: Public $50, Members $35
Prerequisite: Refuge, please bring Tsok offering if possible

Guru Rinpoche (Sanskrit: Padmasambhava) brought Vajrayana Buddhism to Tibet in the 8th century C.E. at the invitation of King Trisong Detsen. He is revered as a Second Buddha. Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche states, “If someone wants to successfully practice Dzogchen, one must receive the Guru Rinpoche empowerment.” Tulku Yeshi will also teach on how to perform the daily Guru Rinpoche practice. He received the Guru Rinpoche empowerment from many highly realized Lamas, so he believes that the collective blessings are powerful and will be of great benefit to all.

Commitment: Recite Guru Rinpoche’s mantra 108 times each day or as many times as possible.

Tulku Yeshi Rinpoche is a Dzogchen master and the reincarnation of Dzogchen Gyaltsab Thodo Rinpoche. He was recognized by H.H. Dalai Lama's Nyingmapa teacher Kyabje Trulshig Rinpoche. He received teachings from twenty-five masters representing all five schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Tulku Yeshi has written thirteen books, ten of which have been published, on the subject of Tibetan Buddhism and culture, including “A One Thousand Year History of Sakyapa.” He has published three books in English: his autobiography “A Modern Liberation Odyssey - An Autobiography of a Tibetan Nomad Lama”, “Handbook for Half-Buddhas” and “Tibetan Zen.” He also writes novels, poetry for mind training, provides Tibetan astrology readings, can advise people on how to enjoy their life, and can bestow empowerments. Currently he is working on Dharma activities at Sakya Monastery in Seattle.

 

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